The Best Players from Each State (California, Colorado, & Connecticut)

As we roll on through the great states of the USA, we’ve come to the C’s.

California

Not surprisingly, the state of California has produced a large number of high quality players. Before we even get to the Hall of Farmers, there are so many names of players who appeared in multiple All-Star games…

Graig Nettles, CC Sabathia, Dwight Evans, Chase Utley, Mark McGwire, Keith Hernandez, Dave Stieb, David Wells, Jason Giambi, Ryan Braun, Nomar Garciaparra, Darryl Strawberry, and on and on the list goes. But, ahead of this list are the 24 Hall of Famers from The Golden State.

On the list from California, you have everything from the really old-school greats (like Frank Chance, the player/manager of the game’s first dynasty – the Chicago Cubs who went to 4 of 5 World Series from 1906-1910) to much more modern iterations of baseball greatness (like Dennis Eckersley and Trevor Hoffman who were inducted primarily for pitching one inning per game). On the pitching side, you have some of the absolute best there ever were. Randy Johnson, who struck out more than 4,800 batters in his career – the 2nd most all time. Tom Seaver, who won 311 games with a career ERA of 2.86.

But, for the absolute greatest, I have to go with a batter from California. No, it isn’t Barry Bonds, even though he technically has the highest WAR among all of them, and technically hit more HR than anyone. I just don’t think his pre-steroids numbers are quite as good. And, no, it isn’t even the great Joe DiMaggio, who only had 8 more strikeouts in his career than home runs.

For me, the greatest player to ever come out of California was a contemporary of DiMaggio – which turned out to be unfortunate for him, because his demeanor wasn’t as nice as Joe’s, which cost him more than one MVP award. I have to go with the last man to hit .400 for a season…

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Ted Williams – a career .344 batting average, with over 500 HR, and 2600 hits. 2 MVP’s (should have been about 5), 2 Triple Crowns, and holds the highest career OBP in history (.482). It’s hard to fathom what his total numbers might be had he not lost essentially five years to service in the military during WWII and Korea. For my money, Williams is the best pure hitter the game has ever seen. Which made this an easy choice, in spite of all the great players from California.

Colorado

The state of Colorado hasn’t produced a ton of major league talent. Just 94 players have come from The Centennial State. And only 7 of those have ever appeared in a single All-Star Game.

But, despite this seeming lack of quality production from this state, there are two Hall of Famers from Colorado. And, the choice of the greatest definitely came down to these two. It was a somewhat difficult choice, because they are both pitchers, but pitchers from very different eras, with very different roles.

Ultimately, I did not choose Rich “Goose” Gossage, in spite of his 300+ saves, 9 All-Star Games, and World Series championship in 1978. Instead I went with the only other pitcher to throw a no-hitter in the postseason, besides Don Larsen‘s perfect game in 1956…

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Roy HalladayHalladay won 2 Cy Young’s, and was runner-up on two other occasions. He led the league in shutouts on multiple occasions, as well as strikeout-to-walk ratio. He finished as high as 6th in MVP voting, and has an impressive career win pct. of .659. He was also selected for 8 All-Star games, and was inducted into the HOF just last month.

Connecticut

Can you believe that the little state of Connecticut has produced more than twice as many major league players as Colorado? And, many of them had decent careers – Mo Vaughn, Charles Nagy, Brad Ausmus, Dick McAuliffe, and Jim Piersall.

But, there are only three Hall of Famers from The Constitution State. And every one of them played in the dead-ball era. So, for now, the greatest player to come from the state of Connecticut is…

Connor Roger 751.86 PD

Roger Connor – this Waterbury native played from 1880-1897 for the Troy Trojans, New York Gothams, and St. Louis Browns. Connor was a power-hitter, leading the league in SLG multiple times, and finished 2nd in the league in HR in multiple seasons. He finished his career with an impressive … 138 career HR, which was actually the all-time record. It was a record that would stand for 23 years after his retirement. And, in spite of the fact that he didn’t hit what we would consider to be a lot of home runs, he still had a career OPS of .883 – higher than the likes of Jackie Robinson, Sammy Sosa, Mark Teixeira, and Jose Canseco.

But, Mr. Connor may not hold his grip on this title much longer. There’s a young right fielder born in New Britain, CT that is charging up the leaderboard, by the name of George Springer.

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